• The Hope Fund
  • Journey to Hope
  • John Braddy
  • Jocie Patterson
  • Jane Blum
  • Anne Kirby
  • Robby Roberson
  • Leslie Denton
  • Harry Cantey
  • Conni Singletary
  • Stephanie Benjamin
  • Fulfilling A Vision
  • Training for Survival
  • Coping Through Expressions of Art
  • Giving Patients A Lift
  • Giving HOPE to Those in Need
  • Mark Haselden Cancer Survivor
  • Divya Jain Artful Expressions
  • James Grice, Patient Testimonial
  • Donald LaBelle – Cancer Survivor
  • Penny Bonnoitt, Cancer Survivor
  • Deb Colones, Cancer Survivor
  • Linda Russell, Cancer Survivor
  • Dr. Bill Hester, Cancer Survivor
  • Marilyn McDonald, Cancer Survivor
  • Elizabeth Atkinson, Cancer Survivor
  • Betty Moore Bell, Cancer Survivor
  • Elizabeth Hyman, Cancer Survivor
  • Adriane Poston
  • Carolyn Gary
  • Kathy Campbell
  • Leon Rogers
  • Robin Aiken, HOPE Fund
  • Audrey Gilbert
  • Inspired To Support the Care of Others
  • HOPE Fund Expands to the Coast
  • Giving the Gift of HOPE
  • The Hope Fund

  • Journey to Hope

  • John Braddy

  • Jocie Patterson

  • Jane Blum

  • Anne Kirby

  • Robby Roberson

  • Leslie Denton

  • Harry Cantey

  • Conni Singletary

  • Stephanie Benjamin

  • Fulfilling A Vision

    The efforts of one person can have a significant impact on the lives of others. But the combined contributions of many can continue to touch lives for generations to come.

    n example of this level of generosity is the One Vision, One Future Campaign for McLeod Health, the largest capital campaign in the history of the McLeod Health Foundation. Philanthropic funding was an essential element in the plans and nearly 1,200 donors from across the region and beyond responded generously by contributing more than $6.5 million dollars to the campaign efforts.

    Named One Vision, One Future, it encompassed three major projects: the campaign enabled the McLeod Foundation to fund the new Emergency Department at McLeod Dillon, the McLeod Hospice House Addition and the new McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research.

    “We wish to express our deep gratitude and appreciation to the caring donors who helped make these projects possible as well as the numerous volunteers who worked tirelessly to share the value of improved services, new technology and enhanced patient environments that would be available to all seeking cancer, hospice or emergency care in our region,” said Beverly Hazelwood, Co-Chair of the One Vision, One Future Campaign.

    On January 31, 2014, as donors gathered to tour the new McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research, Shirley Meiere, Co-Chair of One Vision, One Future, said, “Today, we stand in this beautiful new facility which is the final project funded by the campaign. On behalf of the McLeod Foundation Board of Trustees, we wish to thank the countless volunteers and donors who supported the campaign efforts which will touch lives for generations to come.”

    McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research

    Dedicated to the physical and emotional needs of cancer patients and their families, the McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research is a beacon of hope and healing for the communities McLeod serves. As one of the most patient-centered environments, the Center has been designed to offer the highest quality, individualized care with convenient access to all cancer services and care.

    The Cancer Center offers natural light, a cascading water wall, garden views, and relaxing furnishings to inspire, sooth and comfort patients and family members. Patients can also easily manage their physician appointments and infusion or radiation treatments all in one location. In addition, they can participate in cancer research and meet with an oncology navigator or social worker without ever leaving the center.

    New technology in the Cancer Center includes installation of the most modern, up to date, state-of-the-art linear accelerator – making McLeod the region’s only facility capable of performing Brain and Body Stereotactic Radiosurgery, a radiation therapy procedure that uses special equipment to position the patient and precisely deliver a large radiation dose to a tumor in the brain or body over a shorter amount of time and with fewer treatments. For example, using traditional technology in the treatment of stereotactic cases, a brain tumor treatment may take 45 minutes or longer to image and treat a patient. With the new linear accelerator, similar cases will require less than 15 minutes to perform the same treatment. McLeod is one of only two centers in the state that can offer patients this level of treatment – the other hospital is located in the upstate.

    McLeod Hospice House Addition

    Responding to the needs of the community, McLeod Health completed construction of an additional 12 inpatient rooms for the McLeod Hospice House in 2012. The expanded facility now offers 24 inpatient rooms. In addition to the new rooms, the expansion included two family comfort areas and additional office space. A new Meditation Garden was also created adjacent to the additional patient rooms to offer patients and families an area of respite.

    McLeod Dillon Emergency Department

    An organized effort was led by the McLeod Foundation to raise funds in the Dillon community to improve and enhance the McLeod Dillon Emergency Department in 2011. The renovation and construction project included a 9,365 square feet expansion to the Emergency Department. The new design featured 17 new exam and treatment rooms, including designated triage and trauma rooms, a decontamination area, and staff support spaces. A new family waiting area is also allowing for improved privacy and safety.

  • Training for Survival

    Training thoroughbreds takes determination and grit. Doris Rabon reflects these traits.

    As owner of Glenview Farm, Doris and her husband Eric operate a nationally known horse training facility in Timmonsville, where thoroughbreds are prepared to compete in steeplechase and flat-track racing. However, in August of 2013, Doris entered a new training ground in her own life following a diagnosis of breast cancer.

    Years of training horses has taught Doris patience and perseverance. And, thanks to the support of donors to the McLeod Foundation, Doris is headed full speed ahead to recovery through the assistance of the STAR Program® (Survivorship Training and Rehabilitation). STAR is a unique cancer rehabilitation program designed to minimize the side effects of cancer treatment, and support cancer survivors in functioning at the highest level possible.

    McLeod Regional Medical Center, the only hospital in eastern South Carolina to offer this program, earned the STAR Program® Certification from Oncology Rehab Partners, an organization that provides healthcare professionals with training and tools to develop and deliver quality cancer rehabilitation services to cancer survivors. The STAR Program Certification training for McLeod Regional Medical Center staff was made possible through a grant provided by the McLeod Health Foundation.

    “We strive to reduce the side effects of cancer treatments and improve the lives of cancer survivors,” said Ashley Atkinson, Senior Occupational Therapist and McLeod STAR Program Coordinator. “These side effects can include fatigue, muscle aches, bone or joint pain, lymphedema, weakness and balance problems, chemotherapyinduced peripheral neuropathy (a nerve disorder that can cause weakness, numbness, tingling and pain in the hands and feet), and difficulty with memory or concentration.”

    Doris was introduced to the STAR Program when Ashley visited her in the hospital the day after her bilateral mastectomy surgery.

    “Following her surgery, Doris was having significant shoulder pain, tightness, and loss of motion on both sides of her body,” explained Ashley. “I worked with her for three months on an outpatient basis. She started chemotherapy during that time, and fatigue became a factor as well, but she was able to push through it. I believe STAR has helped her not only physically, but emotionally as well.”

    Prior to her diagnosis with cancer, Doris explained that she was a very healthy, active individual. In fact, she had been working out three times a week for eight years with Trainer Chad Gainey at the McLeod Health & Fitness Center. The surgery to remove the breast cancer and begin the reconstruction process with tissue expanders took its toll on Doris’ upper body strength, despite her fitness.

    “I never dreamed it would affect me like it did,” said Doris. “You take it for granted that you can easily lift your arms to take a cup out of the cabinet, drive your car or wash your hair. Following surgery, these tasks were much more difficult. It also affected my ability to care for the horses because you need the strength in your arms to brush down or put the saddle on a horse.”

    On the way to one of her first rehabilitation sessions with Ashley at McLeod Outpatient Rehabilitation, Doris said she was in a great deal of pain and was not feeling well from the effects of treatment. “During the appointment, Ashley performed a lymphatic massage. I literally walked out of there feeling like a whole new person.”

    Ashley explained that a lymphatic massage or manual lymphatic drainage is used to reduce inflammation, pain, and swelling after a patient has undergone a procedure where their lymph nodes have been removed. “It is a very soft, rhythmic manipulation of the skin that moves fluid out that may have accumulated at the site of the lymph node procedure. The soothing, light pressures we use also promote a calming response from the parasympathetic nervous system. This allows the patients to
    release the tension and stress.”

    Another method Ashley utilized with Doris involved kinesiotape, a therapeutic taping strategy used to relax tense muscles and alleviate pain as well as help redirect swelling toward a healthy area in the body’s lymph system. “Patients wear it home after their therapy session to continue the benefits we achieve during their treatment.”

    Other techniques Ashley employed with Doris included stretching and scar massage to help with her shoulder pain and tightness in her chest.

    Doris is currently completing chemotherapy. She still has radiation treatments ahead of her and another surgery to complete her breast reconstruction. She then plans to return to the STAR Program for more therapy. “You have no idea how much it meant to me to have access to this program,” said Doris. “Now I want to help other women learn about the benefits of the STAR Program.”

    For more information about the McLeod STAR Program, please call Ashley Atkinson, McLeod Senior Occupational Therapist and STAR Program Coordinator, at (843) 777-4697.

  • Coping Through Expressions of Art

    Expressing one’s self through art is often seen as a gift only pursued by those with talent. Yet, the use of art can serve many purposes. It can help a person struggling to express their feelings or cope with a diagnosis. Art is also considered a great stress reliever.

    Uniquely aware of the benefits of art for cancer patients and caregivers, Cancer Survivors Raquel Serrano and Harriet Jeffords and Chaplain Stuart Harrell approached the McLeod Health Foundation for funding to establish an arts-based support group.

    The result of their efforts is Artful Expressions, a new McLeod Cancer Support Group held at 2 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at the Florence County Museum.

    “Having cancer is a stressful life event, and symptoms of cancer are not limited to the physical,” explains Serrano, a Certified Oncology Social Worker for the McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research. “Many of our cancer patients and caregivers are in distress and in need of additional psycho-social care and support.”

    Serrano added that those coping with cancer often report experiences of distress marked by:

    • Feelings of loss and grief
    • Emotional and physical pain
    • Anger
    • Relationship difficulties
    • Worry
    • Loneliness, isolation or feeling judged
    • Difficulty connecting to meaning or faith/spirituality
    • Fear
    • Feeling out of control

    “At times, cancer patients often do not have the self-awareness to recognize these emotions or are hesitant to express them because they feel they should just be grateful to be alive. This program is an effort to help patients manage these feelings of distress, which affect the whole person – body, mind and spirit,” said Serrano.

    Each monthly support group session lasts two hours providing time for introductions, creation of artwork and discussion, according to Serrano. The art projects also involve different mediums including drawing, mixed media, journaling and scrapbooking to allow cancer patients to use creativity to express their emotions. In addition, the group facilitators are incorporating supportive themes with the art lesson each month such as fear of recurrence, body image, financial concerns, finding meaning, and sharing the individual’s journey.

    A Registered Physical Therapist, Jeffords learned to create pottery during her cancer journey. “Art is a tremendous stress reliever and it helps with relaxation. We have seen through the group that people relax as they participate which tends to allow them to share their personal experiences with each other. In addition, no art experience is necessary – your willingness to express yourself is all you need.”

    Benefits of participation in the support group for patients and caregivers include a reduction in stress, anxiety, and symptoms of depression; improved self-esteem and overall feelings of self worth; an increase in social and communication activities; and more energy.

    Thanks to sponsorship by the McLeod Foundation, the Florence Regional Arts Alliance and the Florence County Museum, there is no cost to attend the sessions and supplies are provided. For more information on Artful Expressions, please contact: Raquel Serrano at (843) 777-5695.

  • Giving Patients A Lift

    Many patients find themselves overwhelmed after receiving a diagnosis of cancer. They must also begin to cope with the magnitude of the appointments, tests, and treatments they require to improve their health. Sometimes, that concern extends to transportation. The McLeod Foundation and its donors support a program called Loving Initiative for Transportation that gives these patients a lift in their cancer journey.

    Transportation to a doctor’s appointment, scheduled treatment for radiation or chemotherapy creates anxiety for many cancer patients. A lack of transportation for scheduled appointments is a barrier to the successful treatment of a cancer patient’s disease.

    “Consider, for example, a radiation patient who must receive treatment seven days a week for six weeks. Without transportation, this is not possible,” explained Raquel Serrano, the Certified Oncology Social Worker for McLeod Cancer Services.

    One patient impacted by the LIFT program is Sarah McElveen, who was raised in Pamplico along with ten brothers and sisters. She is the sixth of her siblings to be diagnosed with cancer.

    When Sarah was informed that she had both colon and breast cancer, her surgeon, Dr. Amy Murrell, explained to her that she would need six weeks of radiation therapy treatment.

    Sarah, who has a naturally positive outlook, knew she needed help. She did not have a car or money to afford the daily trips from Pamplico to Florence for the life-saving treatments. Sarah shared her concern with Dr. Murrell’s office. Through the assistance of the McLeod Radiation Oncology staff, Raquel was contacted to help Sarah with transportation.

    The Loving Initiative for Transportation (LIFT) Program provides assistance to patients diagnosed with cancer who do not have any other form of transportation in order to receive their cancer treatments. The program provides assistance by a contracted driver, gas vouchers, taxi vouchers or shuttle services. LIFT is funded entirely through generous gifts to the McLeod Foundation.

    “When you become sick and do not have the means to get well, you need help. I am so very thankful that McLeod had a program to help me,” said Sarah.

    Sarah recently celebrated the completion of her cancer treatment by ringing the bell in Radiation Oncology. This is a tradition that began in 2005 when Cancer Survivor George Bennett donated the commemorative bell to the McLeod Radiation Oncology Department.

    Sarah was surrounded by other patients she had grown close to during her appointments. These patients shared the common bond of a cancer diagnosis and Sarah became their inspiration. She encouraged them by sharing “that while the body ages, the spirit is forever young.”

    Sarah firmly believes that God provided for her care. She is also grateful for McLeod Foundation donors whose gifts made the LIFT program available for her and many others.

  • Giving HOPE to Those in Need

    The HOPE Fund Advisory Committee includes from left to right (front row): Amy Johnston, Robin Aiken, Judy Bibbo, Janet Brand and Marilyn Godbold; (second row): Frances Bethea, Pam Elliott, Susan Burley, Audrey Gilbert and Deb Colones.
    Not pictured: Shirley Meiere, Beverly Hazelwood, Linda Russell, Linda Mallick, Ann Rodgers Chandler and Lisa McDonald.

    Driven by a desire to make a difference in the lives of cancer patients, Robin Aiken is determined to give hope to those in need.

    Robin wanted to bring a program to McLeod similar to the one she experienced first hand in the North Carolina hospital where her older sister, Wana Kaye, received treatment for pancreatic cancer. Robin and her family made numerous trips to the hospital located near Wana Kaye’s home in Pinehurst between 2003 and 2006.

    “During my sister’s treatment, my family and I witnessed the counseling, assistance and companionship the hospital’s Cancer Patient Support Services team provided to patients from all walks of life,” said Robin.

    “We watched as they met needs; such as providing gas money so a family member could accompany a patient to treatment or covering the cost of the placement of port-a-cath so those without financial resources wouldn’t have to have a vein accessed every time they had chemotherapy. While we were financially blessed to provide whatever my sister needed to be comfortable, others were not as fortunate, and it was eye opening.”

    A new member of the McLeod Health Foundation Board of Trustees, Robin serves on the grants committee. In reviewing the requests from the Cancer Center, Robin learned that the oncology staff often struggled to fund immediate cancer patient needs.

    This concern led Robin to establish a program that would directly benefit those who turn to the McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research for care. The new program is called the HOPE Fund which stands for “Helping Oncology Patients Everyday.”

    “This program is designed to address the unique needs of cancer patients and their families. We established the HOPE Fund through the McLeod Foundation to manage funding for oncology patient support services and to provide oncology staff with easier access to immediate assistance needs,” Robin explained.

    Robin also worked with the Foundation to create an advisory committee of community members who have been touched by cancer either as a patient or caregiver.

    The Foundation HOPE Fund Advisory Committee includes Aiken who serves as Chair; Frances Bethea; Janet Brand; Susan Burley; Deb Colones; Audrey Gilbert; Beverly Hazelwood; Amy Johnston; Linda Mallick; Shirley Meiere; Ann Rodgers Chandler and Linda Russell. The committee also includes representation of McLeod staff members including Judy Bibbo, Vice President of Patient Services; Lisa McDonald, Director of Outpatient Oncology Services; Marilyn Godbold, Director of Volunteer Services; Jill Bramblett, Foundation Executive Director; and Roxanna Tinsley, Foundation Development Officer.

    “Each of these individuals has shared their own experience with us and helped provide direction as we started this process,” said Robin.

    In order to get the HOPE Fund up and running, Robin’s mother chose to gift a portion of her IRA to the McLeod Health Foundation in memory of Wana Kaye, in order to help cancer patients in her community. Since their first meeting in October, Robin and several members of the advisory group have also contributed and helped secure significant donations for the fund.

    “It energizes all of us when we sit in our meetings and hear from staff members like Raquel Serrano, the Oncology Social Worker, relating to us the struggles these patients are experiencing. These interactions provide us with a strong dose of reality of the problems these patients are facing,” Robin said. “We want to identify individual needs and requests as well as barriers these patients have to getting well and whole again.”

    To date, the advisory committee has funded:

    • A Volunteer Coordinator who will recruit, train and schedule volunteers to serve in the Cancer Center. The volunteers will be available to help with wayfinding, assist visitors in the Cancer Center Library and provide patients with items from the HOPE Cart.
    • Comfort Trays for the inpatient unit to provide food and drink items for families who do not want to leave the bedside of loved ones.
    • A Hope Cart for the inpatient unit allowing volunteers to offer magazines, books, headphones and snacks to patients and family members.
    • Educational manuals for patients diagnosed with brain tumors.
    • Liquid nourishment supplements to stock a Patient Home Nutrition Closet for patients who are undergoing treatment for head, neck and esophageal cancers.
    • An Immediate Needs Fund for patients who cannot afford what they need to get well, such as: dentures, transportation assistance, home medical equipment or medication.

    “We have been blessed to accomplish so much already. The opportunity to make real, tangible differences in the lives of cancer patients is encouraging us to act quickly and decisively to provide assistance for patients who often have no where else to turn,” said Robin.

    Robin added that her service on the HOPE Fund committee isn’t about keeping Wana Kay’s memory alive. “I want her cancer journey and what she went through to have meaning. I think that’s true for everyone on the committee.”

  • Mark Haselden Cancer Survivor

  • Divya Jain Artful Expressions

  • James Grice, Patient Testimonial

  • Donald LaBelle – Cancer Survivor

  • Penny Bonnoitt, Cancer Survivor

  • Deb Colones, Cancer Survivor

  • Linda Russell, Cancer Survivor

  • Dr. Bill Hester, Cancer Survivor

  • Marilyn McDonald, Cancer Survivor

  • Elizabeth Atkinson, Cancer Survivor

  • Betty Moore Bell, Cancer Survivor

  • Elizabeth Hyman, Cancer Survivor

  • Adriane Poston

  • Carolyn Gary

  • Kathy Campbell

  • Leon Rogers

  • Robin Aiken, HOPE Fund

  • Audrey Gilbert

  • Inspired To Support the Care of Others

    The McLeod Foundation has embarked on “It’s Time,” a capital campaign for McLeod Health. This continues a commitment to excellence inspired by Dr. F. H. McLeod in 1899 when his vision for the Florence Infirmary began.

    Support will help with the provision of the latest technology with 3D Mammography and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Monitors in addition to funds to supplement costs of construction for a new Emergency Department at McLeod Regional Medical Center. These important enhancements will ensure that McLeod Health offers the highest quality care to patients from the midlands to the coast.

    3D Mammography

    Debi Kalaritis, a 16-year breast cancer survivor, knows firsthand the power of technology in detecting breast cancer. In 2001, after accidently scheduling her mammogram five months early, Debi learned she had breast cancer.

    “Luckily for me, McLeod was in the process of installing digital mammography and training the staff at that time,” said Debi. “I sincerely believe divine intervention played a part in my diagnosis because not only did I schedule the test early, but I was also told that since I was under 45 years old my insurance only paid for a mammogram every other year. I immediately made the decision that I was already there so I would have the mammogram and pay for it myself.”

    Fortunately for Debi, she made the right decision to proceed with the test. “The new digital images identified two suspicious areas in two different quadrants of my left breast that were not detected on my previous mammogram seven months earlier. This was critical to my decision to have a mastectomy and, after tissue analysis, a third cancer was also detected.”

    After a mastectomy and six months of chemotherapy, Debi was cancer free. Today, she and her husband Panos are supporting the McLeod Foundation’s capital campaign to bring 3D Mammography to McLeod.

    “Panos and I believe that the technology in ‘first generation’ mammography may have missed my cancer; however, early, effective digital detection was critical to my survival. We want to ensure that other women in the region have an even better option for early detection and treatment of breast cancer,” added Debi.

    3D Mammography is a new screening and diagnostic breast imaging unit that improves the detection of breast cancer. Using 3D technology, an X-ray arm moves over the breast and takes multiple images in seconds. Traditional digital mammography takes two-dimensional images of the breast. With 3D images, the radiologist can examine the breast tissue one thin layer at a time, detecting invasive cancers at earlier stages and ultimately saving lives.

    Another advantage of 3D Mammography includes a 40 percent reduction in the call back rate, sparing women the anxiety, inconvenience and cost of returning for further imaging studies. 3D also provides a more precise identification of the tumor and its location.

  • HOPE Fund Expands to the Coast

    The expansion of cancer care on the coast is being enhanced with the addition of a unique program designed to support patients undergoing cancer treatment.

    In the fall of 2014, the HOPE (Helping Oncology Patients Everyday) Fund was established at the McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research for cancer patient support services such as medication, transportation and nutrition assistance as well as to provide the oncology staff with improved access for the immediate needs of their patients.

    HOPE Fund Advisory Committee members and donors to the Annual An Evening of Hope Cancer Benefit raised nearly $667,000 to support the needs of cancer patients receiving care at the McLeod Cancer Center in Florence. With the addition of cancer services at McLeod Seacoast, a HOPE Fund has now been established on the coast.

    The arrival of Dr. Stewart Sharp to McLeod Oncology and Hematology Seacoast and the opening of the expanded infusion wing in the Same Day Services Suite supported the founding of the HOPE Fund at McLeod Seacoast. The 11-chair infusion area meets the needs of the growing community that McLeod Seacoast serves, and offers convenience and access to infusion care for patients. Infusion therapy involves medicine, nutrients or special fluids delivered through a needle directly into the body, such as chemotherapy.

    The McLeod Foundation Advisory Board at McLeod Seacoast established a golf tournament to raise money for their HOPE Fund. The inaugural McLeod Seacoast Cancer Benefit Golf Classic presented by Atlantic Urology Clinics raised more than $70,000 to benefit the HOPE Fund. The two-day event was held in October at the Grande Dunes Member’s Club in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.

    “The success of this event is a testament to our sponsors and contributors,” said Kelly Hughes, McLeod Health Foundation Director. “These funds are going to make a very real difference in the lives of our patients who are undergoing treatment for cancer.”

    In addition to the two-day golf tournament, the “Cancer Classic Cocktail Party” presented by Sandhills Bank was hosted on Friday night for the golfers and guests with a gourmet dinner, silent auction and live music by the band, Tru Sol. Cancer Survivor Alice Ziriada also shared her personal journey with cancer during the event and encouraged all attendees to remember those fighting cancer and to support the work of the HOPE Fund.

    Proceeds from the golf classic have gone into the HOPE Fund to assist patients who have financial barriers to care. Without the HOPE Fund, McLeod Seacoast would not be able to offer patients transportation to treatments, assistance with pain and nausea medications and specialized nutrition. The fund also supports volunteer programs and educational resources for cancer patients and families.

    One of the volunteer programs made possible by the HOPE Fund is the addition of the HOPE Cart. During chemotherapy treatments, a McLeod Seacoast Volunteer visits with the patients and offers them snacks, reading materials, puzzle books, blankets made by community groups and other items they may need from the HOPE Cart to make their treatment sessions more comfortable.

    The Foundation also administered HOPE Fund dollars to purchase a HOPE Bell for patients to ring at the completion of their chemotherapy treatments. At the conclusion of her treatment for lymphoma, Wendi Parnell became the first patient to ring in this tradition at McLeod Seacoast. The bell symbolizes the end of the treatment journey for one patient and serves to inspire other patients currently receiving treatment.

  • Giving the Gift of HOPE

    Countless cancer patients benefit from the establishment of the HOPE (Helping Oncology Patients Everyday) Fund in October of 2014.

    The advisory committee ensures that generous donations to the HOPE Fund are designated for cancer patient support services and any immediate needs a patient may have. They also support the Cancer Center’s volunteer program and educational resources for patients and families.

    Lauren Snipes joined the McLeod Cancer team as the HOPE Fund Coordinator in the Fall of 2016. This was a dream come true for the HOPE Fund Advisory Committee. Since the inception of the fund, the committee desired to have a personal point of contact in the McLeod Center for Cancer Treatment and Research to ensure all cancer patients are made aware of the resources available to them.

    Robin Aiken, Chair of the HOPE Fund Advisory Committee, said the group is extremely pleased to have Lauren in place as the full-time HOPE Fund Coordinator. “She is responsible for coordinating and administering the HOPE Fund. Now, instead of relying on the clinical staff to identify needs, Lauren can assess what a patient might be missing and how to fill these unique requests.”

    Based out of the HOPE Resource Center, Lauren meets with each new cancer patient on their first day of treatment. In addition to offering guidance and answering any questions or concerns they may have, she secures resources for patients such as transportation, medication or nutrition assistance.

    Conveniently located on the concourse of the Cancer Center, the HOPE Resource Center houses a variety of tools to assist patients in better understanding their diagnosis, side effects of treatment and long-term survival issues. The center also serves as a resource to family members, caregivers, survivors, community members, students and staff.

    Another project near and dear to the committee’s hearts involved the impact a patient’s appearance can have on them during their cancer journey. Understanding these image concerns led the advisory committee to establish the “We’ve Got You Covered” program in early 2016.

    “We’ve Got You Covered” provides McLeod cancer patients who will experience hair loss with a $100 gift certificate for a head covering of their choice from the Inspirations Gift Shop in the McLeod Cancer Center. The head coverings offered include wigs, scarves, hats and caps which can serve to help patients feel more confident about their appearance during cancer treatment.

    Through Lauren, the HOPE Resource Center, and the image program, donors to the HOPE Fund continue to positively impact the lives of cancer patients with hope.