Health Blog with a stethoscope sitting on top of a laptop.

Welcome to Our Blog.

At McLeod Health, we are dedicated to providing useful health and medical information to our community. Take a look at our blog categories and choose those that interest you. Be sure to subscribe to each category of interest and we will send you new blog articles as they are posted.

  • Home
    Home This is where you can find all the blog posts throughout the site.
  • Categories
    Categories Displays a list of categories from this blog.
  • Tags
    Tags Displays a list of tags that have been used in the blog.

9 Tips for Exercising with Incontinence

Posted on in Women's Health

Medically reviewed by Chris McCauley, MD

According to a survey of more than 300 women, 47% noted some degree of incontinence while exercising. In female athletes, especially runners, the physical activity seems to actually trigger incontinence. Even for the recreational exerciser, embarrassing episodes in public situations can traumatize a woman struggling with stress incontinence. And your gym or fitness center is a very public place. “It’s important to keep exercising for your overall health, even with incontinence,” says McLeod Gynecologist Chris McCauley, MD. “Certain types of exercises should be avoided, but you can take some simple steps to can continue a healthy lifestyle.”

Medically reviewed by Merritt King, III, MD

Nancy was disappointed when her Gynecologist explained that there was no magic bullet for her urge incontinence and that feeling at the most awkward times that she had to go to the bathroom. “Unlike stress incontinence, which has a variety of non-surgical and surgical treatments, in urge incontinence, surgical options are reserved for only the most severe cases,” says McLeod Gynecologist Merritt King, III, MD. “Yet, a better knowledge of what can trigger or worsen urge incontinence will help avoid those embarrassing public situations.”

Medically reviewed by Joycelyn Schindler, MD

Menopause is part of a woman’s natural aging process. Many women find that incontinence seems to be part of her change in life. However, incontinence during menopause is not inevitable. It can be cured with physical therapy, biofeedback, medication and surgery. “Menopause is a time of many hormonal and physical changes for a woman,” says McLeod Gynecologist Joycelyn Schindler, MD. “Some of these transitions – a weakening of pelvic muscles, a less elastic bladder and weight gain exerting pressure on the bladder – contribute to incontinence. And every woman’s response to menopause is unique. Yet, there are measures you can take to increase your chances of maintaining continence.”

Medically reviewed by Joycelyn Schindler, MD

Pregnancy brings the promise of a bouncing new baby. On the other hand, the hormonal changes and stretching of a woman’s body bring the prospect of post-pregnancy stress incontinenceOne study indicated that about 25% of first-time mothers experience urinary incontinence and about 50% experience some pelvic prolapse.


From a presentation by McLeod Gynecologists Dr. Marla Hardenbergh and Dr. Brad Campbell

The causes of endometriosis, the growth of uterine lining cells outside the uterus, are still unknown. Yet, there are a few treatments that seem to work.


From a presentation by McLeod Gynecologists Dr. Marla Hardenbergh and Dr. Brad Campbell

Endometriosis can be a painful, recurring problem. Even with today’s medical breakthroughs, McLeod Gynecologists Marla Hardenbergh and Brad Campbell say many elements of endometriosis remain a mystery:


From a presentation by McLeod Gynecologists  Dr. Brad Campbell and Dr. Marla Hardenbergh

Many women suffer the embarrassment and discomfort of stress incontinence, where urine leaks with a sneeze or cough. In answering questions at a recent public event, two experienced Gynecologists discuss the problem and possible solutions.


From a presentation by McLeod Physical Therapist Taylor Holmes

Women’s incontinence problems can be treated with medication and surgery. But Therapist Taylor Holmes says you may be successful by starting with simple exercises and physical therapy.

Medically Reviewed by Taylor Holmes, PT, DPT, STAR-C

More and more women are talking with their doctor about urinary leakage or incontinence. And that’s a good thing. There’s no reason to live with the embarrassment and anxiety of stress incontinence or an overactive bladder. “Many women may experience relief of symptoms with surgical intervention, medication, or conservative treatment such as physical therapy,” says McLeod Physical Therapist Taylor Holmes. “Physical therapy for urinary incontinence involves pelvic floor muscle training, bladder training, and electrical stimulation. It should be considered a first line of treatment for this condition due to its effectiveness and low risk for adverse effects."

Medically reviewed by Charles Tatum, MD

“Another morning with pain,” groaned Marla as she awoke, thinking this was the third day in a row she felt this bad. Marla was having her period, but even between periods, Marla felt discomfort in her pelvic area. A hint that it was more than her period. If you feel discomfort (at best) and real pain (at worst) along with serious bleeding during your period, you’d see your gynecologist. Right? Not necessarily, says the research. A series of studies around the world report a delay of more than 9 years from the time a woman first feels the effects of endometriosis until treatment begins. Endometriosis is the result of tissue that normally grows inside the uterus, beginning to grow outside. 

Medically reviewed by Gary Emerson, MD

What you eat. And how much. What you drink. And how much. Training for when you go to the bathroom. And how often. Special exercises for your pelvic muscles. “Call them lifestyle modification or behavioral intervention. These are the first tools we’ll use when we work with you to control your bladder control problem,” says McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, MD.  “Whether it’s stress incontinence – leakage when you cough or sneeze – or urge incontinence – that feeling you “have to go” triggering a rush to the bathroom – nearly 4 out of 10 women will find some relief before moving to medications or surgery.”

Medically reviewed by Brad Campbell, MD

If you’re suffering from a pelvic health problem – incontinence, fibroidsendometriosis – you don’t need a pile of research to tell you that your whole life is affected. Physical symptoms – urine leakage, pain, bleeding – are just the start. The physical problems trigger anxiety, embarrassment, and insomnia that fall like a shroud over your entire life. Stick with us. There’s good news yet to come. But first, a look at what women – like you – said about their overall quality of life.

Medically reviewed by Brad Campbell, MD

Two out of 3 women never discuss bladder health or incontinence with their doctor. Shyness. Embarrassment. Shame. A feeling that, “it’s just part of growing old.” Or not knowing which medical professional can help. All these are reasons you may suffer in silence with stress incontinence or urge incontinence  – wearing pads, limiting your social life, or continually searching for a public restroom. Gynecologists are trained to help you with this problem – one that occurs in 40% of women after giving birth.  

What’s the Mess with Mesh for Prolapse

Posted on in Women's Health

Medically reviewed by Melissa Brooks, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Dillon

Watch TV much? Then, you’ve probably seen those lawyers' commercials: “Was mesh used on your pelvic organ prolapse surgery? Well you should see a lawyer.…” Did those TV ads make you hesitate to have surgery for your pelvic organ prolapse? Here’s information that may help you rethink your decision.


From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

From large, very visible scars traveling across the abdomen to small scars, less pain, and faster recovery.  That describes the path that surgery for incontinence and other women’s pelvic health problems has taken in the 21st Century. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D., describes the progress and outlines where minimally invasive techniques are used today:

From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

That sudden, unexpected urge to urinate – anytime, anywhere – can cripple a woman’s life. Constantly searching for restrooms. Hurrying to get there in time. “Unfortunately, there are no entirely successful surgical solutions to this problem,” says McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D. Yet, he notes that non-surgical solutions are improving.


From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Like many surgical approaches, the ability to treat stress incontinence has made tremendous advances in the past several decades. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D., explains the most common surgical and non-surgical treatments for women who have embarrassing bladder leakage when they cough or sneeze:


From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

The day a woman finally decides to move past the embarrassment of Stress Incontinence or Urge Incontinence and seek care, is a benchmark she’ll long remember.  It’s the start of a journey to regain control of her life. No more leakage when she sneezes or coughs. No more constant scanning for a bathroom because of her overactive bladder. Yet, a woman has some work to do before she sees the doctor. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D. suggests keeping a diary is key to beginning the diagnosis, evaluation and treatment:

Medically reviewed by Marla Hardenbergh, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Dillon

At its most basic, Pelvic Organ Prolapse is a woman’s bladder, uterus or rectum pushing down on her vagina. “The first thing you need to know is: this will not kill you,” says Dr. Marla Hardenbergh of McLeod OB/GYN Dillon.  “Prolapse may cause discomfort and embarrassment, but it is not life-threatening.”


From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

A woman knows if she has a problem with incontinence.  A short visit with her gynecologist can determine potential treatments, many times with the help of a test that determines her bladder’s ability to control leakage.

The information on this site is intended to increase your awareness and understanding of specific health issues and
services at McLeod Health. It should not be used for diagnosis or as a substitute for health care by your physician.
To report technical issues, please contact us. Public Access to Information or To Report a Concern.

©2012 McLeod Health. Download Vendor Code of Conduct | HIPAA Notice of Privacy Practices | Patient Bill of Rights
Report a Concern | Visitation | Download McLeod Health Mission & Values