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Recent blog posts

From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Like many surgical approaches, the ability to treat stress incontinence has made tremendous advances in the past several decades. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D., explains the most common surgical and non-surgical treatments for women who have embarrassing bladder leakage when they cough or sneeze:

Medically reviewed by Michael Sutton, D.O.

You’re thinking about a total joint replacement. And there is a lot to think about when it comes a new knee or hip joint. “The actual surgery for knee replacement or hip replacement is very common, but gives a patient much to consider, “ says McLeod Orthopedic Specialist Dr. Michael Sutton. “Testing, the day of surgery, pain, coming home, returning to your life and work. Here are some tips on avoiding problems after your surgery so that you get the most out of that new knee or hip.”


From an interview with Alan Blaker, M.D. Pee Dee Cardiology

Cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons play different and equally important roles in the care of a patient with Heart Disease, as McLeod Cardiologist Alan Blaker explains: Cardiologists will generally handle the diagnosis and medical treatment or nonsurgical procedures like balloon angioplasty, coronary stents, ablation procedures or devices like pacemakers or defibrillators. Cardiothoracic surgeons will handle bypass surgery and surgical valve replacement procedures. After surgery the patient will usually follow up with a cardiologist long term once released by the surgeon. Some newer procedures actually involve the talents of both cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgery such as TAVR or percutaneous valve replacement procedures. 


From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

The day a woman finally decides to move past the embarrassment of Stress Incontinence or Urge Incontinence and seek care, is a benchmark she’ll long remember.  It’s the start of a journey to regain control of her life. No more leakage when she sneezes or coughs. No more constant scanning for a bathroom because of her overactive bladder. Yet, a woman has some work to do before she sees the doctor. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D. suggests keeping a diary is key to beginning the diagnosis, evaluation and treatment:

Medically reviewed by Rodney Alan, M.D.

“I’m sweating like when I was a kid picking cucumbers in July,” thought Michael as he approached the airport security checkpoint. It was anxiety – not the summer heat – triggering Mike’s perspiration. He was taking his first airplane trip after receiving a hip joint replacement. “Will my hip set off the metal detector?  Will they pull me out of line for an embarrassing and time-consuming special check?” worried Mike. Michael’s not alone. The rate of total joint replacements for knee and hips continues to climb. Even the U.S. economic downturn, starting in 2008, did not halt the growth of joint replacements. One researcher called them “recession proof.” If you’re like Michael – living with a knee joint or hip replacement and planning air travel -- you might have a few questions. 


From an interview with Alan Blaker, M.D. Pee Dee Cardiology

Stenosis, from the Greek meaning “narrowing.”  Leaking, from the plumbing, meaning “drippy” or “to escape.” These terms refer to problems that can arise with your heart valves.  McLeod Cardiologist Alan Blaker offers some insight into faulty heart valves:

Medically reviewed by Marla Hardenbergh, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Dillon

At its most basic, Pelvic Organ Prolapse is a woman’s bladder, uterus or rectum pushing down on her vagina. “The first thing you need to know is: this will not kill you,” says Dr. Marla Hardenbergh of McLeod OB/GYN Dillon.  “Prolapse may cause discomfort and embarrassment, but it is not life-threatening.”

6 Tips on Preventing Breast Cancer

Posted on in Cancer

Medically reviewed by Rajesh Bajaj, MD

Surviving breast cancer starts with spotting it early by  keeping a close eye out for a new breast lump, pain or swelling in the breast (especially in the nipple) or nipple discharge other than milk. Although the actual cause of breast cancer isn’t yet known, there are a number of healthy habits that can help prevent it:


From an interview with Patrick Denton, M.D. Pee Dee Orthopedic Associates

You finally decided to see an Orthopedic Specialist for that knee or hip pain. They diagnosed an arthritic or deteriorated joint. Conservative treatments didn’t work. Surgery was performed. Now what? McLeod Orthopedic Specialist Patrick Denton, M.D. outlines what you should see from this point on:


From an interview with Scot Schultz, M.D. McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates

McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgeon Dr. Scot Schultz has successfully treated thousands of heart patients with Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.  However, Dr. Schultz cautions that – after surgical repair – it’s the patient’s responsibility to avoid another surgery:

Mammograms: Promise and Limitations

Posted on in Cancer

Will You Be 1 in 5 Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer? - National Breast Cancer Foundation Medically reviewed by Noel Phipps, MD

Mammograms don’t prevent cancer and they have their limitations. Yet, mammograms are the most effective way available to screen women for breast cancer. “Studies show that regular mammograms lower a woman of 50’s risk of dying by 35%,” says McLeod Radiologist Dr. Noel Phipps. “Screening mammograms are an essential part of the overall process of discovering and treating breast cancer, along with a woman’s self-exam and a physician’s clinical exam.”

Total Joint Replacement – What You Can Expect

Posted on in Orthopedics

From an interview with Dr. Patrick Denton Pee Dee Orthopedic Associates

Traveling to a foreign country. Eating unfamiliar food. Having your hip or knee joint replaced. The “unknown” in anything can create anxiety. To help reduce your anxiety about total joint replacement, McLeod Orthopedic Surgeon Patrick Denton explains what you can expect.


From an interview with Scot Schultz, M.D. McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates

Heart Bypass Surgery: It means your life has changed.  But following recovery from a Coronary Artery Bypass Graft procedure, most of your normal activities can become part of your life again. McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgeon Dr. Scot Schultz offers an overview of the bypass procedure and its recovery process.

From an article by Amy Murrell, MD Pee Dee Surgical Group

In the last decade, multiple advancements are increasing long-term survival for women with breast cancer. These advancements have included improvements in imaging technology, enhanced surgical techniques and new discoveries in oncology.


From an interview with Patrick Denton, M.D. Pee Dee Orthopedic Associates

Younger and younger people are new knee and hip joints.  Yet, surgery is not always the place to start when your joints are hurting, according to McLeod Orthopedic Specialist Patrick Denton, M.D.

Coronary Artery Bypass Graft. Time for Yours?

Posted on in Heart Health

From an interview with Dr. Scot Schultz McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates

Surgically bypassing clogged arteries is one of the most common heart procedures.  A person rushed to the hospital for a heart attack is one of the most likely patients of the heart bypass. McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgeon Dr. Scot Schultz discusses who may need a bypass BEFORE the heart attack strikes. 


From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

A woman knows if she has a problem with incontinence.  A short visit with her gynecologist can determine potential treatments, many times with the help of a test that determines her bladder’s ability to control leakage.


From an interview with Scot Schultz, M.D. McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgical Associates

Bypassing blocked arteries near the heart has been a successful surgical procedure since the 1960s.  A small number of cardiothoracic surgeons are using a technique that, in appropriate patients, can result in lower risks from side effects of the surgery. McLeod Cardiothoracic Surgeon Scot Schultz explains the two major types of coronary artery bypass surgeries:


From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

A small incision during a simple outpatient procedure can mark your return to pelvic health, according to Dr. Brad Campbell of McLeod OB/GYN Associates.

Brachytherapy: Attacking Cancer With Radiation From Inside

Posted on in Cancer

Medically reviewed by Tobin C. Hyman, MS, DABR Chief Medical Physicist

Radiation therapy for cancer  is delivered in two primary forms: External, in which a large x-ray generator sits outside the patient directing beams into the patient and Internal, where the radiation is placed inside the patient mere millimeters from the tumor or directly inside the tumor. Internal Radiation Therapy is also called Brachytherapy. Roughly translated, it means “short distance therapy” – it’s a short distance between the radiation and the tumor. A small thin tube – called a catheter – is used to deliver radioactive solids to the site of the cancer.  Solids can be capsules, seeds, micro-spheres, or ribbons about the size of a grain of rice.  Other methods of internally delivering radioactive material to the site of the disease/tumor include ingestion of a pill (ex., for thyroid cancer) or injection/infusion through an IV (ex., for bone cancer). 

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