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Recent blog posts

Treating Breast Cancer – Before & After Surgery

Posted on in Cancer

Medically reviewed by Michael Pavy, MD

It’s not a great statistic: 1 in 8 women will have breast cancer during their lifetime. However, here is a better statistic: for women with Stage I breast cancer, the 5-year survival rate is greater than 95%. For Stage II, it’s 93%. Even for Stage III, it’s still 72%. This focus on survival is, in large part, due to refinements and developments in breast cancer treatment. Most women with a breast tumor will have breast cancer surgery. But, there are many other elements to their treatment.

From an interview with Rajesh Malik, MD Pee Dee Cardiology

A generation ago, when your cardiologist suggested a “pacemaker,” they were suggesting a device whose primary, if not sole, purpose was to correct a slow heart rate. Today’s pacemaker is as much like THAT pacemaker as today’s newest cell phone is like a 1999 cell phone that ONLY made phone calls. Today’s pacemaker – like today’s cell phone – can accomplish many tasks in a small package. It can speed up slow hearts, slow down fast hearts and trigger irregular heart beats to stay in rhythm.

Medically reviewed by Joycelyn Schindler, MD

Pregnancy brings the promise of a bouncing new baby. On the other hand, the hormonal changes and stretching of a woman’s body bring the prospect of post-pregnancy stress incontinenceOne study indicated that about 25% of first-time mothers experience urinary incontinence and about 50% experience some pelvic prolapse.

Medically reviewed by Eric Heimberger, MD

Hip Joint Replacements are one of the most successful procedures available today. Hundreds of thousands Americans will have a hip replacement just this year. The most common reasons you might need a hip replacement are arthritis (either Osteoarthritis from “wear and tear” or chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis) or an injury to the hip that triggers arthritis or causes bone damage. “We encourage patients to try medications, injections or physical therapy before moving to surgery,” says McLeod Orthopedic Specialist Eric Heimberger, MD. “People from age 50 can benefit from the total joint replacement if their hip pain limits everyday activities (as simple as walking), if pain continues after resting or at night, and if the non-surgical efforts don’t bring relief.”

From an interview with Brian Wall, MD Pee Dee Cardiology

Ask McLeod Cardiologist Brian Wall, MD if there’s a link between you, heart disease and your family…and his answer is quick and unequivocal. “Sure. Absolutely,” Dr. Wall says. “ We’ve known since research in the 1930s that there is a correlation between your risk of heart disease and your family’s history.” 


From a presentation by McLeod Gynecologists Dr. Marla Hardenbergh and Dr. Brad Campbell

The causes of endometriosis, the growth of uterine lining cells outside the uterus, are still unknown. Yet, there are a few treatments that seem to work.

Medically reviewed by David Lukowski, MD

Think about what medical professionals call your “activities of daily living. For the rest of us, this means brushing your teeth (ow!), tying a shoelace (ouch!), making a cup of coffee (argh!), starting your car (ache!), reaching for your wallet (uugh!)… Almost anything you do during the day requires use of your wrist, hand and thumb. Pain makes the entire day a struggle.

From an interview with  Alan Blaker, MD Pee Dee Cardiology

The heart is a muscle.  When that heart muscle weakens or the muscle becomes too stiff, it can’t pump enough blood to the body to meet the body's demands. This condition is called Congestive Heart Failure.


From a presentation by McLeod Gynecologists Dr. Marla Hardenbergh and Dr. Brad Campbell

Endometriosis can be a painful, recurring problem. Even with today’s medical breakthroughs, McLeod Gynecologists Marla Hardenbergh and Brad Campbell say many elements of endometriosis remain a mystery:

Medically reviewed by Pat Denton, MD Pee Dee Orthopaedic Associates

One-third of Americans age 65+ will suffer from Osteoarthritis, commonly caused by normal “wear and tear.” Most often, it significantly affects your hips and knees, the body’s weight bearing joints. Since the first total knee joint replacement in 1968, along with 1) better techniques, 2) longer-lasting materials, and 3) mature adults as young as 50 seeking to stay active longer, this procedure has become increasingly common. Some 700,000 knee replacements are performed annually in this country. And it may climb to more than 3 million a year by 2030.

Claudication: Long Name for Pain When Walking

Posted on in Heart Health

From an interview with Gabor Winkler, MD McLeod Vascular Associates

When you can’t walk a long distance without pain, it may not simply be that you are out of shape.  It could be a shortage of oxygen getting to your limbs.  McLeod Vascular Surgeon Gabor Winkler, MD describes the problem and its treatment options.


From a presentation by McLeod Gynecologists  Dr. Brad Campbell and Dr. Marla Hardenbergh

Many women suffer the embarrassment and discomfort of stress incontinence, where urine leaks with a sneeze or cough. In answering questions at a recent public event, two experienced Gynecologists discuss the problem and possible solutions.


From an interview with Gabor Winkler, MD McLeod Vascular Associates

Blockages in the arteries can trigger pain from oxygen-starvation.  McLeod Vascular Surgeon Gabor Winkler, MD explains diagnosing and treating Peripheral Arterial Disease or PAD:


From an interview with Gabor Winkler, MD McLeod Vascular Associates

The role of vascular surgeons is often confused with their fellow sub-specialists, the cardiothoracic surgeons.  McLeod Vascular Surgeon Gabor Winkler, MD offers this quick overview:

From an article by Brian Wall, MD Interventional Cardiologist

The path to cardiovascular disease is clear: obesity leads to high blood pressure and diabetes, which leads to heart attack, vascular problems, congestive heart failure and stroke. It’s a well-traveled path in the United States, where two-thirds of adults are overweight or obese. In South Carolina, where the path is paved with our delicious fried foods and yummy mac and cheese, the percentage is even higher. In the United State, heart disease is the number one killer.


From a presentation by McLeod Physical Therapist Taylor Holmes

Women’s incontinence problems can be treated with medication and surgery. But Therapist Taylor Holmes says you may be successful by starting with simple exercises and physical therapy.

Medically reviewed by David Lukowski, M.D. McLeod Orthopaedics Seacoast

The quarterly report was nearly finished… when they hit Margaret. Pins and needles in her hand. A dull ache in her arm. “It’s not as bad as last night,”  she thought. “But it really hurts.” Margaret struggles with pain from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) – a problem with the wrist that’s three times more likely to trouble women than men. “In the wrist, there is a small tunnel with the carpal bones forming the bottom and sides,” says McLeod Orthopedic Specialist Dr. David Lukowski, M.D. “Tendons and nerves run through the tunnel. And the top is covered with connective tissue called a ligament. The tendons can swell when irritated, squeezing the nerves. The result is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.”

Radiation Therapy Can Find, Shrink and Cure Cancer

Posted on in Cancer

From an interview with Virginia Clyburn-Ipock, MD McLeod Radiation Therapy

Radiation – more powerful than an X-ray – brings many benefits to today’s cancer patients. It can diagnose, shrink and even kill off tumors.

Medically Reviewed by Taylor Holmes, PT, DPT, STAR-C

More and more women are talking with their doctor about urinary leakage or incontinence. And that’s a good thing. There’s no reason to live with the embarrassment and anxiety of stress incontinence or an overactive bladder. “Many women may experience relief of symptoms with surgical intervention, medication, or conservative treatment such as physical therapy,” says McLeod Physical Therapist Taylor Holmes. “Physical therapy for urinary incontinence involves pelvic floor muscle training, bladder training, and electrical stimulation. It should be considered a first line of treatment for this condition due to its effectiveness and low risk for adverse effects."

Medically reviewed by Eric Heimberger, MD McLeod Orthopaedics Seacoast

The fact that our hip or knee joints wear out shouldn’t surprise us. Consider this:  forces 4 to 8 times our body weight are exerted millions of times each yearon our hip and knee joints. If you are considering hip or knee joint surgery, you may also be interested in learning more about the materials used in hip and knee joint implants, along with some advantages and disadvantages of each. 

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services at McLeod Health. It should not be used for diagnosis or as a substitute for health care by your physician.
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