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Posted on in Women's Health

Need a Reminder to Do Your Kegels? Stick it.

Medically reviewed by Dale Lusk, MD

Squeeze….and release.  Squeeze…and release. Among the effective non-surgical treatments for female urinary incontinence, the Kegel is one of the simplest. At its simplest, the Kegel involves squeezing your pelvic muscles, as if you are trying to stop the urine flow. And it’s best when performed numerous times during the day. “Yes, but how am I supposed to remember?” You might ask.  “Stick it,” says Gynecologist Dale Lusk, M.D. of Advanced Women's Care. “I tell patients to buy some of those little red, green or blue sticky dots that they can get at the office supply or discount store. Take a marker and write a big ‘K’ on each one. Then, stick it on your TV remote. Whenever you see the dot, do a few Kegels. Stick one on your car’s rear view mirror. Every time you hit a red light, do a few Kegels. Stick one inside the refrigerator. Open the door; do a Kegel or two. Stick one on a book you’re reading. When you sit down to read, do a few Kegels.” 

According to Dr. Lusk, Kegels are not only good for women with leakage problems. They are also a good exercise for all women, and even men, who want to retain pelvic muscle tone.

For the more technologically-oriented, Apple and Android offer apps for your phone or tablet that can teach you how to do Kegels and remind you to do them.

Although it’s not a recommendation, among the apps you can find are Kegel Camp, Kegel Kat, and Kegel Tunes exerciser. 

“If you don’t use those muscles, they will atrophy,” says Dr. Lusk. 

So, let’s get Kegeling! Squeeze…and release.

To learn more about female urinary incontinence issues, watch this video with Dr. Lusk.

To find a physician, click here.

Sources include: McLeod Health, National Institutes of Health, Appcrawler, Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality, John M. Eisenberg Center for Clinical Decisions and Communications Science.

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