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From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

From large, very visible scars traveling across the abdomen to small scars, less pain, and faster recovery.  That describes the path that surgery for incontinence and other women’s pelvic health problems has taken in the 21st Century. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D., describes the progress and outlines where minimally invasive techniques are used today:

From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

That sudden, unexpected urge to urinate – anytime, anywhere – can cripple a woman’s life. Constantly searching for restrooms. Hurrying to get there in time. “Unfortunately, there are no entirely successful surgical solutions to this problem,” says McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D. Yet, he notes that non-surgical solutions are improving.


From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Like many surgical approaches, the ability to treat stress incontinence has made tremendous advances in the past several decades. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D., explains the most common surgical and non-surgical treatments for women who have embarrassing bladder leakage when they cough or sneeze:


From an interview with Gary Emerson, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

The day a woman finally decides to move past the embarrassment of Stress Incontinence or Urge Incontinence and seek care, is a benchmark she’ll long remember.  It’s the start of a journey to regain control of her life. No more leakage when she sneezes or coughs. No more constant scanning for a bathroom because of her overactive bladder. Yet, a woman has some work to do before she sees the doctor. McLeod Gynecologist Gary Emerson, M.D. suggests keeping a diary is key to beginning the diagnosis, evaluation and treatment:

Medically reviewed by Marla Hardenbergh, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Dillon

At its most basic, Pelvic Organ Prolapse is a woman’s bladder, uterus or rectum pushing down on her vagina. “The first thing you need to know is: this will not kill you,” says Dr. Marla Hardenbergh of McLeod OB/GYN Dillon.  “Prolapse may cause discomfort and embarrassment, but it is not life-threatening.”


From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

A woman knows if she has a problem with incontinence.  A short visit with her gynecologist can determine potential treatments, many times with the help of a test that determines her bladder’s ability to control leakage.


From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

A small incision during a simple outpatient procedure can mark your return to pelvic health, according to Dr. Brad Campbell of McLeod OB/GYN Associates.


From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Working on a farm or on an assembly line are just two risks that can cause the embarrassing – but not fatal – problem of pelvic organ prolapse, says Brad Campbell, MD of McLeod OB/GYN Associates.

Medically reviewed by Dr. Brad Campbell, M.D.McLeod OB/GYN Associates

What's normal and what's not normal when considering a woman's monthly menstrual bleeding? Here are some guidelines to determine if you have "dysfunctional uterine bleeding":

Medically reviewed by Brad Campbell, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

"I'm glad you called right away," Mary's OB/GYN assured her. Mary was surprised when she started bleeding because she thought when her menopause ended 5 years ago, her bleeding was over, too. Recently, Mary started spotting or light bleeding. Then, the bleeding grew heavier and she again needed to wear pads. "The formal name for Mary's situation is Postmenopausal Bleeding," says McLeod OB/GYN Brad Campbell, M.D. "About 10% of women over age 55 will experience the problem. Most causes are benign. However, 1 out of 10 women who start to bleed more than a year after their menopause had ended, will face endometrial cancer. It's important to see your OB/GYN right away to find out the actual cause and possible treatments."

The Impact of Endometriosis on Fertility

Posted on in Women's Health

From a presentation by Charles Tatum, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Endometriosis and its treatments can hurt a woman’s chances of getting pregnant, but McLeod Gynecologist Charles Tatum, M.D., says that is not always the case.

Endometriosis and Its Treatments

Posted on in Women's Health

From a presentation by Charles Tatum, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Discomfort. Bleeding. Pain. All these symptoms can be signs of Endometriosis, when tissue normally found inside a woman’s uterus starts to grow outside the uterus. McLeod Gynecologist Dr. Charles Tatum offers this overview of the treatments available:


From a presentation by Charles Tatum, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

What is this painful pelvic problem? What are the risk factors? How does the doctor diagnosis it? And when is it time for you to go to your doctor? McLeod Gynecologist Dr. Charles Tatum touches on all these topics. 

Medically Reviewed by Dr. Gary Emerson, McLeod OB/GYN Associates

When a woman’s pelvic region loses muscle tightness and the uterus slips, this is a condition called prolapse. Pain during sexual intercourse, loss sensation in the vagina/cervix or difficulty achieving orgasm are common symptoms for women with prolapse. So, it’s natural that women want to know, “Will I be able to have a normal sex life after treatment?”

Today’s First Option for Treating Stress Incontinence & Pelvic Organ Prolapse Has a Long History Medically reviewed by Dr. Gary Emerson, McLeod OB/GYN Associates

In the 5th Century BC, physicians in the age of Hippocrates were treating urinary incontinence by inserting pomegranate fruits in the vaginas of female patients. Today’s pessary – a silicone or plastic support – is one of the most widely used options for women suffering from Stress Incontinence or Pelvic Organ ProlapseIn much the same way that an underwire bra can help support breasts, the pessary supports the bladder when inserted in the vagina, helping stop urine leakage. 

Medically reviewed by Dale Lusk, MD

Squeeze….and release.  Squeeze…and release. Among the effective non-surgical treatments for female urinary incontinence, the Kegel is one of the simplest. At its simplest, the Kegel involves squeezing your pelvic muscles, as if you are trying to stop the urine flow. And it’s best when performed numerous times during the day. “Yes, but how am I supposed to remember?” You might ask.  “Stick it,” says Gynecologist Dale Lusk, M.D. of Advanced Women's Care. “I tell patients to buy some of those little red, green or blue sticky dots that they can get at the office supply or discount store. Take a marker and write a big ‘K’ on each one. Then, stick it on your TV remote. Whenever you see the dot, do a few Kegels. Stick one on your car’s rear view mirror. Every time you hit a red light, do a few Kegels. Stick one inside the refrigerator. Open the door; do a Kegel or two. Stick one on a book you’re reading. When you sit down to read, do a few Kegels.” 

Medically Reviewed by Taylor Holmes, DPT, STAR-C

Surgery is the gold standard for pelvic repair to “cure” urinary leakage or stress incontinence. However, following the diagnosis, nearly every gynecologist will start with a series of non-surgical options.

Modifying behavior and the way a woman reacts to her body’s signals has been the focus of clinical attention in the US for several decades. One of these – biofeedback – can be used in conjunction with Pelvic Muscle Exercises – also known as kegels.

BIOFEEDBACK

Medically reviewed by Dr. Brad Campbell

A woman’s reproductive organs can be affected by five main types of cancer, identified by the location where it started: ovarian, cervical, uterine, vaginal and vulvar. This article looks at symptoms associated with ovarian cancer. A woman has two ovaries in her pelvis, located on either side of her uterus.  They produce the eggs for reproduction as well as some female hormones. There is no simple, reliable test for ovarian cancer, in the way a Pap test can identify cervical cancer. Making it even more confusing for a woman, many of the symptoms are typical of other non-cancerous problems. 

Medically Reviewed by Brad Campbell, MD

A Higher Risk is Actually Good News for Women A study unveiled in late 2013 indicated that 1 in 5 women face a risk sometime in her life of surgery for urinary incontinence or pelvic prolapse surgery.

Medically Reviewed by Charles Tatum, MD 

DID YOU KNOW  By age 65, more than a third of US women have had a hysterectomy. Women living in the US South or Midwest are more likely to have a hysterectomy. Hysterectomy is a descriptive term that covers a range of surgical procedures and options. At its most basic, a hysterectomy is surgery to remove a woman’s uterus. (The uterus is where a baby grows.)

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