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From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

A small incision during a simple outpatient procedure can mark your return to pelvic health, according to Dr. Brad Campbell of McLeod OB/GYN Associates.


From a presentation by Dr. Brad Campbell McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Working on a farm or on an assembly line are just two risks that can cause the embarrassing – but not fatal – problem of pelvic organ prolapse, says Brad Campbell, MD of McLeod OB/GYN Associates.

Medically reviewed by Dr. Brad Campbell, M.D.McLeod OB/GYN Associates

What's normal and what's not normal when considering a woman's monthly menstrual bleeding? Here are some guidelines to determine if you have "dysfunctional uterine bleeding":

Medically reviewed by Brad Campbell, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

"I'm glad you called right away," Mary's OB/GYN assured her. Mary was surprised when she started bleeding because she thought when her menopause ended 5 years ago, her bleeding was over, too. Recently, Mary started spotting or light bleeding. Then, the bleeding grew heavier and she again needed to wear pads. "The formal name for Mary's situation is Postmenopausal Bleeding," says McLeod OB/GYN Brad Campbell, M.D. "About 10% of women over age 55 will experience the problem. Most causes are benign. However, 1 out of 10 women who start to bleed more than a year after their menopause had ended, will face endometrial cancer. It's important to see your OB/GYN right away to find out the actual cause and possible treatments."

The Impact of Endometriosis on Fertility

Posted on in Women's Health

From a presentation by Charles Tatum, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Endometriosis and its treatments can hurt a woman’s chances of getting pregnant, but McLeod Gynecologist Charles Tatum, M.D., says that is not always the case.

Endometriosis and Its Treatments

Posted on in Women's Health

From a presentation by Charles Tatum, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

Discomfort. Bleeding. Pain. All these symptoms can be signs of Endometriosis, when tissue normally found inside a woman’s uterus starts to grow outside the uterus. McLeod Gynecologist Dr. Charles Tatum offers this overview of the treatments available:


From a presentation by Charles Tatum, M.D. McLeod OB/GYN Associates

What is this painful pelvic problem? What are the risk factors? How does the doctor diagnosis it? And when is it time for you to go to your doctor? McLeod Gynecologist Dr. Charles Tatum touches on all these topics. 

Medically Reviewed by Dr. Gary Emerson, McLeod OB/GYN Associates

When a woman’s pelvic region loses muscle tightness and the uterus slips, this is a condition called prolapse. Pain during sexual intercourse, loss sensation in the vagina/cervix or difficulty achieving orgasm are common symptoms for women with prolapse. So, it’s natural that women want to know, “Will I be able to have a normal sex life after treatment?”

Today’s First Option for Treating Stress Incontinence & Pelvic Organ Prolapse Has a Long History Medically reviewed by Dr. Gary Emerson, McLeod OB/GYN Associates

In the 5th Century BC, physicians in the age of Hippocrates were treating urinary incontinence by inserting pomegranate fruits in the vaginas of female patients. Today’s pessary – a silicone or plastic support – is one of the most widely used options for women suffering from Stress Incontinence or Pelvic Organ ProlapseIn much the same way that an underwire bra can help support breasts, the pessary supports the bladder when inserted in the vagina, helping stop urine leakage. 

Medically reviewed by Dale Lusk, MD

Squeeze….and release.  Squeeze…and release. Among the effective non-surgical treatments for female urinary incontinence, the Kegel is one of the simplest. At its simplest, the Kegel involves squeezing your pelvic muscles, as if you are trying to stop the urine flow. And it’s best when performed numerous times during the day. “Yes, but how am I supposed to remember?” You might ask.  “Stick it,” says Gynecologist Dale Lusk, M.D. of Advanced Women's Care. “I tell patients to buy some of those little red, green or blue sticky dots that they can get at the office supply or discount store. Take a marker and write a big ‘K’ on each one. Then, stick it on your TV remote. Whenever you see the dot, do a few Kegels. Stick one on your car’s rear view mirror. Every time you hit a red light, do a few Kegels. Stick one inside the refrigerator. Open the door; do a Kegel or two. Stick one on a book you’re reading. When you sit down to read, do a few Kegels.” 

Medically Reviewed by Taylor Holmes, DPT, STAR-C

Surgery is the gold standard for pelvic repair to “cure” urinary leakage or stress incontinence. However, following the diagnosis, nearly every gynecologist will start with a series of non-surgical options.

Modifying behavior and the way a woman reacts to her body’s signals has been the focus of clinical attention in the US for several decades. One of these – biofeedback – can be used in conjunction with Pelvic Muscle Exercises – also known as kegels.

BIOFEEDBACK

Medically reviewed by Dr. Brad Campbell

A woman’s reproductive organs can be affected by five main types of cancer, identified by the location where it started: ovarian, cervical, uterine, vaginal and vulvar. This article looks at symptoms associated with ovarian cancer. A woman has two ovaries in her pelvis, located on either side of her uterus.  They produce the eggs for reproduction as well as some female hormones. There is no simple, reliable test for ovarian cancer, in the way a Pap test can identify cervical cancer. Making it even more confusing for a woman, many of the symptoms are typical of other non-cancerous problems. 

Medically Reviewed by Brad Campbell, MD

A Higher Risk is Actually Good News for Women A study unveiled in late 2013 indicated that 1 in 5 women face a risk sometime in her life of surgery for urinary incontinence or pelvic prolapse surgery.

Medically Reviewed by Charles Tatum, MD 

DID YOU KNOW  By age 65, more than a third of US women have had a hysterectomy. Women living in the US South or Midwest are more likely to have a hysterectomy. Hysterectomy is a descriptive term that covers a range of surgical procedures and options. At its most basic, a hysterectomy is surgery to remove a woman’s uterus. (The uterus is where a baby grows.)


Medically Reviewed by Timothy Hagen, DO

May is National Stroke Awareness Month.  Stroke is the leading cause of death and long-term disability in the United States.  For a number of reasons, more women suffer this “heart attack of the brain” than men.  A number of issues -- such as migraine headaches with auras, smoking, hormone therapy, preeclampsia during pregnancy, age and family history – can put a woman at increased risk of stroke.  High blood pressure is both a risk of stroke and a sign to watch for.

Stroke. You Could Die…or….

Posted on in Women's Health

Medically Reviewed by Timothy Hagen, DO May is National Stroke Awareness Month

Tips on Lowering Your Risk of Long-Term Disability. Stroke is the leading cause of death in the United States – with more women suffering a stroke than men, thanks to risk factors, such as migraineshormone therapy and oral contraceptives. Death from stroke is tragic. Yet, stroke “survivors” can take months to recover from the disabilities. And up to 30% of the stroke survivors never recover.Avoid stroke by lowering your blood pressure with this tips for women from McLeod Neurologist Dr. Timothy Hagen


May is National Stroke Month

Medically Review by Timothy Hagen, DO


May is National Stroke Awareness Month
Medically Review by 
Timothy Hagen, DO

Migraine headaches are more common in women than men.  Migraines can often be crippling, sending a women to a quiet, darkened bedroom. Migraines are said to put a woman at greater risk of stoke than even family history of heart problems or high cholesterol.

5 Things You Need to Know About Endometriosis

Posted on in Women's Health

When a Woman’s Body Rebels
Medically reviewed by 
Dr. Dale Lusk

Ideally, tissue and blood vessels grow to line a woman’s uterus, enabling her to become pregnant. Once a month, if she’s not pregnant, the uterus sheds the lining. That’s her period. 

Medically reviewed by Dr. Dale Lusk

Fibroids – non-cancerous growths – that form in and around the uterus can cause heavy bleeding, pain, discomfort during sex and a frequent need to urinate. The most common way to eliminate the problem is for a woman to have the fibroids and her uterus removed through a hysterectomy. When the fibroids are removed, the bleed and pain will diminish. 

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